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Posts tagged with "science is awesome"

laughingsquid:

SciShow Explains How and Why Beavers Build Dams

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading
Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.
Map observations
The map tends to highlight two types of areas:
places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.
Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.
At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.
Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.
Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.
In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.
Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.
::
Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.
I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?
Errata
The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::
©mapsbynik 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth Made with Tilemill USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

Feb 8

science-junkie:

neuromorphogenesis:

Bionic hand allows patient to ‘feel’

Dennis Aabo was able to feel what was in his hand via sensors connected to nerves in his upper arm

Scientists have created a bionic hand which allows the amputee to feel lifelike sensations from their fingers.

A Danish man received the hand, which was connected to nerves in his upper arm, following surgery in Italy.

Dennis Aabo, who lost his left hand in a firework accident nearly a decade ago, said the hand was “amazing”.

In laboratory tests he was able to tell the shape and stiffness of objects he picked up, even when blindfolded.

The details were published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Read More

itsfrenchthellama:

dazedwinter:

braydaaan:

kiss-the-g1rl:

unshaped:

filling a bathtub with the substance, throwing the person you hate the most in the tub and throwing the ice cube in the tub right after …. it would be over

such evil minds in this place

i love this evilness 

Nah, don’t just throw it in you gotta flick it dramatically over your shoulder without looking as you walk away, preferably with a darkly humorous one-liner.

"The cold never bothered me anyway"

itsfrenchthellama:

dazedwinter:

braydaaan:

kiss-the-g1rl:

unshaped:

filling a bathtub with the substance, throwing the person you hate the most in the tub and throwing the ice cube in the tub right after …. it would be over

such evil minds in this place

i love this evilness 

Nah, don’t just throw it in you gotta flick it dramatically over your shoulder without looking as you walk away, preferably with a darkly humorous one-liner.

"The cold never bothered me anyway"

Nov 3

gogglechild:

spaceace8:

idjtits:

spaceace8:

idjtits:

idjtits:

idjtits:

are pears flammable

after 2 hours of trying to set alight to a pear i can condclude they are not flammable

mum: whats that smell
me: burning pears
mum: wha-
me: i tried to set a pear on fire
mum: why
me: science

#It’s science as long as you write it down

image

science

[science clapping] well done friend

you forgot your data table:image

image

cineraria:

Introducing WildCat - YouTube

dtriad:


The Nevada National Security Site, 1300 square miles of desert in the American Southwest, is the location of decades of nuclear testing—including the famous Yucca Flats, dubbed “the most bombed place on Earth.” Unsurprisingly, given this concentration of explosive tinkering, the NNS has now turned its attention to storing radioactive waste over the tens of thousands of years it’ll take to decay. To this aim, they created the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste depository and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 1981, the US Government brought together a group of linguists, scientists, science-fiction writers, anthropologists, and futurists, called it “the Human Interference Task Force,” and tasked the group with stopping people from getting into the waste for 10,000 years. This hodge-podge of thinkers set about creating a system to keep the area abandoned for millennia, warning any possible future people away, regardless of who they were or what languages they spoke. Their ideas were generally pretty insane, but of course they have to be when you’re trying to plan for a future further from us than we are from the stone age. One suggested an atomic priesthood to pass down warnings from generation to generation, and authors Francois Bastide and Paolo Fabbri suggested breeding cats that would change color whenever they got close to radiation. While not due to make a final report until 2028, the current plan is a series of rings of granite pillars and earthen walls, inscribed with warnings in current languages with spaces for more.
Some of the documents from this research, like 1993’s Expert Judgement on Markers to Deter Inadvertent Human Intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and 2004’s Permanent Markers Implementation Plan, are astonishing reads. How do you leave messages to a future people who may be teleporting and riding chrome rockets—or living in post-apocalyptic death squads? How do you create a universal symbol for danger? Skulls aren’t universal: just look at Día de Muertos. The papers talk about how to build structures that almost hurt to look at, enormous spikes projecting out of a field; ugly, jarring, asymmetrical blocks; sites that suggest misery instead of honor or shelter. These are designs that are meant to be viscerally repulsive to all humans, in order to keep them away.

- “The Waste Lands” part one and two (MeFi thread)

dtriad:

The Nevada National Security Site, 1300 square miles of desert in the American Southwest, is the location of decades of nuclear testing—including the famous Yucca Flats, dubbed “the most bombed place on Earth.” Unsurprisingly, given this concentration of explosive tinkering, the NNS has now turned its attention to storing radioactive waste over the tens of thousands of years it’ll take to decay. To this aim, they created the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste depository and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.
 
In 1981, the US Government brought together a group of linguists, scientists, science-fiction writers, anthropologists, and futurists, called it “the Human Interference Task Force,” and tasked the group with stopping people from getting into the waste for 10,000 years.
 
This hodge-podge of thinkers set about creating a system to keep the area abandoned for millennia, warning any possible future people away, regardless of who they were or what languages they spoke. Their ideas were generally pretty insane, but of course they have to be when you’re trying to plan for a future further from us than we are from the stone age. One suggested an atomic priesthood to pass down warnings from generation to generation, and authors Francois Bastide and Paolo Fabbri suggested breeding cats that would change color whenever they got close to radiation. While not due to make a final report until 2028, the current plan is a series of rings of granite pillars and earthen walls, inscribed with warnings in current languages with spaces for more.

Some of the documents from this research, like 1993’s Expert Judgement on Markers to Deter Inadvertent Human Intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and 2004’s Permanent Markers Implementation Planare astonishing reads. How do you leave messages to a future people who may be teleporting and riding chrome rockets—or living in post-apocalyptic death squads? How do you create a universal symbol for danger? Skulls aren’t universal: just look at Día de Muertos. The papers talk about how to build structures that almost hurt to look at, enormous spikes projecting out of a field; ugly, jarring, asymmetrical blocks; sites that suggest misery instead of honor or shelter. These are designs that are meant to be viscerally repulsive to all humans, in order to keep them away.

- “The Waste Lands” part one and two (MeFi thread)

Aug 9

the-siege-perilous:

Sci-fi often starts rambling at the dinner table and gets these really weird, convoluted ideas about something and Science really wants to reach out and squeeze its hand and explain where its logic is flawed, but Science does so love to listen to Sci-fi talk. Even if much of it is complete nonsense, it often articulates it so beautifully and then, occasionally, it will say something absolutely brilliant and Science will be struck speechless, standing up abruptly and wandering off to spend the rest of the night thinking. Sometimes, in the morning, Sci-fi will wake to Science pacing across the bedroom floor, breathlessly excited to show off what it has created - an astonishing approximation/translation of what Sci-fi had been rambling about the night before. 

Often, Science will work really hard and fruitlessly at something for no real reason other than because Sci-fi thought it was cool - and Science loves making Sci-fi happy. In return, Science will sit down in the evening and discover that Sci-fi was paying attention to it and has done it homage in its latest paperback - something that delights and flatters Science so much that they have steamy sex all night long and produce thousands of inspired scientists and writers as offspring. 

(Source: glumshoe)

Aug 9

tardiscrash:

vespidaequeen:

the adventures of jane + science

This post is perfection.

Jane Foster is everything.

(Source: darktheoceans)

(Source: misskerryberry)